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Author Topic: Issues Reported with 3DS + Japanese Trailer  (Read 2143 times)
Galaxia
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« on: January 08, 2011, 12:53:47 pm »

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Nintendo’s latest promotional event for the upcoming 3DS reveals plenty of last minute detail, not all of which is being greeted favourably.

The latest round of announcements coincided with a hands-on event in Chiba which saw some 500 souls braving the chill…

Most notably, Nintendo is saying the device’s batteries will only last for 3-5 hours in normal gameplay (5-8 with DS titles), and take 3.5 hours to recharge. By way of comparison, the PSP is rated at some 4-6 hours.

This, coupled with the various dire warnings about the 3D screen causing blindness and eye cancer in little children, has served to take some of the lustre off the otherwise outstanding hardware on offer.

The 3DS itself is due on the 26th of February, for ¥25,000 – other regions get it slightly later, in March and at about $300.

The (Japanese) release line-up is also attracting opprobrium – only 8 titles are on offer, retailing around the ¥5,000-¥6,000 mark:

Some of the launch titles

New Samurai Warriors game
Professor Layton
Blaz Blue
Puzzle Bobble (bust-a-move)

Most of the other top titles are dated 2011 “spring” and beyond – and MGS, Biohazard, Dead or Alive and Zelda are all undated save for “2011.”
http://community.livejournal.com/aramatheydidnt/1700727.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qyRhEl4Jvw

Going to wait for the 3DS lite, no point in getting a first issues when Nintendo will release 3 other versions shortly afterward. I'm interested in the Biohazard (Resident Evil) game, hopefully it's not another remake.
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Webmaster_Kami
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2011, 09:02:57 pm »

Waiting for a better version sounds pretty good.  They'll release models with longer battery life, better screens, and maybe safer if it's really that hazardous to children.  The warnings about blindness and eye cancer sound strange to me though.  Who's been making those claims?  If it could be proven that it's dangerous to kids, I'd think that Nintendo would be forced to spend a while more on development.  Though, we're talking about a huge, usually trusted company that's beloved at home and abroad.

I still have an original, big blue DS with dim screens.  If 3DS can play DS games, I'll just wait for the right time to get the new system.
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Maki-chan
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2011, 08:30:40 am »

3D movies make my eyes a little buggy after watching them and a movie is only something that I'll do for about 2 hours every couple of weeks at the most. However I shouldn't need to point out that gaming would be a prolonged exposure to the 3D stereo imaging and is not something that I would look forward to myself. While I think that eye cancer is a bit of a stretch, expectations of blindness are not unreasonable. After all blindness in the legal sense is not the whole world going black, but instead significant impairment - 20/200 vision is legally blind if I remember right. 3D television has been out for a while now, so I wonder if similar claims are also being made about that yet?
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2011, 09:40:21 am »

Hmm, actually yeah, nearly a year ago.  I found this in a quick search, maybe there really is a danger.

Quote
11 February 2010

Keep doing that and you'll go blind

A few days ago I found an odd package waiting in my mailbox. One of the commercial TV networks got my postie to deliver a pair of 3D glasses - very old school, with separate red and blue lenses. I spent a few moments assembling them, and presto! I looked like I'd just walked out of a showing of 1954's Creature From the Black Lagoon.

Now that James Cameron's Avatar has become the highest-grossing film in history, 3D is very hot. The hottest new toys unveiled at this year's Consumer Electronics Show were 3D television sets, 3D Blu-Ray players, and comfortable 3D glasses for the lounge room. At least three US-based cable networks have promised 3D broadcasts will begin sometime this year - for the few people who have 3D television sets. Everyone in the consumer electronics industry sees this as the Next Big Thing: now that everyone has purchased big, flat-screen TVs, 3D is the next logical step, the necessary upgrade that keeps us all on the treadmill of progress. The movie studios have also gotten behind 3D in a big way. Just last week Warner Brothers announced that the two final Harry Potter films will be shot in 3D.

Is this the decade of 3D? It might look that way, but we'd all better hope it turns out quite differently. You see, 3D is not good for you.

How can this be? Isn't the real world in 3D? Yes, the real world of objects is definitely three-dimensional. But that's where the similarity ends. What you're shown on a movie screen - or soon, a television - is not true 3D. That's the source of the problem.

Back in the 1990s I did a lot of development work in virtual reality - another technology destined to be the Next Big Thing. I helped Sega develop a head-mounted display (fancy VR headgear) that could be plugged into the Sega Genesis (known as the Mega Drive in Australia). Everything was going swimmingly, until we sent our prototype units out for testing.

Virtual reality headsets use the same technique for displaying 3D as we find in movies or 3D television sets - parallax. They project a slightly different image to each one of your eyes, and from that difference, your brain creates the illusion of depth. That sounds fine, until you realize just how complicated human depth perception really is. The Wikipedia entry on depth perception (an excellent read) lists ten different cues that your brain uses to figure out exactly how far away something is. Parallax is just one of them. Since the various movie and television display technologies only offer parallax-based depth cues, your brain basically has to ignore several other cues while you're immersed in the world of Avatar. This is why the 3D of films doesn't feel quite right. Basically, you're fighting with your own brain, which is getting a bit confused. It's got some cues to give it a sense of depth, but it's missing others. Eventually your brain just starts ignoring the other cues.

That's the problem. When the movie's over, and you take your glasses off, your brain is still ignoring all those depth perception cues. It'll come back to normal, eventually. Some people will snap right back. In others, it might take a few hours. This condition, known as 'binocular dysphoria', is the price you pay for cheating your brain into believing the illusion of 3D. Until someone invents some other form of 3D projection (many have tried, no one has really succeeded), binocular dysphoria will be part of the experience.

This doesn't matter too much if you're going to see a movie in the theatre - though it could lead to a few prangs in the parking lot afterward - but it does matter hugely if it's something you'll be exposed to for hours a day, every day, via your television set. Your brain is likely to become so confused about depth cues that you'll be suffering from a persistent form of binocular dysphoria. That's what the testers told Sega, and that's why the Sega VR system - which had been announced with great fanfare - never made it to market.

Video games are one of the great distractions of youth. Children can play them for hours every day, and our testers realized that children - with their highly malleable nervous systems - could potentially suffer permanent damage from regular and extensive exposure to a system which created binocular dysphoria in its users. This is the heart of my concern, because 3D television is being pitched as an educational medium - Discovery Channel has announced 3D broadcasts will begin mid-year - and that medium could damage the growing minds it is intended to enlighten.

All of this is rolling forward without any thought to the potential health hazards of continuous, long-term exposure to 3D. None of the television manufacturers have done any health & safety testing around this. They must believe that if it's safe enough for the cinema, it's fine for the living room. But that's simply not the case. Getting a few hours every few weeks is nothing like getting a few hours, every single day.

One of two things is about to happen: either 3D television will quickly and quietly disappear from the market, from product announcements, and from broadcast plans, or we'll soon see the biggest class-action lawsuit in the planet's history, as millions of children around the world realize that their televisions permanently ruined their depth perception. Let's hope 3D in the home dies a quiet death.

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/32814.html

Wonder if this was a reason for Nintendo's Virtual Boy failing.  Besides the images looking like a jumble of red and black.  I played around with one briefly in a store.  I've personally never had issues with viewing 3D, nor has my family, but our only exposure has been at the movie theater.  We've been in no rush to see 3D on televisions at home.  There isn't a public outcry about 3D televisions affecting vision yet, but those things are very expensive, and many people might be waiting to make the "upgrade".

Nintendo itself offered warnings about kids using the 3DS.  I feel pretty silly about my earlier post, but it's good to see them taking steps to keep people informed, even if it might cost them sales.  Kind of reminds me of the warnings that take up two thirds of a typical prescription medication commercial.  Honesty is a decent protection against lawsuits.  I wonder if 3D TVs have a similar warning buried somewhere in the user manual.

Quote

Nintendo CEO Iwata defends 3DS child warnings

    * By Laura Parker, GameSpot AU
    * Posted Jan 9, 2011 9:49 pm PT

Top exec stands by recent warnings that the 3D handheld should not be used by children aged six and under; also reveals game giant aiming for 1.5 million units sold in home country by end of March.

With the Nintendo 3DS due to arrive in Japan on February 26 and other territories before the end of March, the publisher has already begun to release a steady stream of information about the stereoscopic handheld and its software. The latest news has come from Nintendo World 2011, a three-day public preview event in Tokyo, Japan, where the publisher announced a long list of 3DS launch titles over the weekend.

The event was also an opportunity for Nintendo to reiterate its message about health and safety in relation to 3D technology. According to gaming blog Andriasang, the publisher has previously issued warnings claiming that the 3DS's 3D mode should not be used by children under the age of six. During Nintendo World 2011, children were only able to play demos in 2D, a move that Nintendo CEO Satoru Iwata defended in an interview with Japan's Wall Street Journal .

According to the article, Iwata said the warnings are an attempt to share information with customers and to warn users against long periods of play, not an indication that the 3DS is dangerous.

Iwata also stated that, based on the "opinion of experts consulted by the company", Nintendo, that some specialists believe extended viewing of 3D video could have a negative effect on vision in young children. Iwata did not disclose who the experts were, but said that the 3DS packaging will include information and warnings about prolonged play and 3D viewing for children.

In the same interview, Iwata also said that Nintendo plans to ship approximately 1.5 million 3DS units in the Japanese market by the end of March, and 4 million units worldwide in the same period.

For more information, check out GameSpot's latest breakdown of the 3DS.

http://www.gamespot.com/news/6286125.html?tag=latestheadlines%3Btitle%3B3
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 10:15:39 am by Webmaster_Kami » Logged
Galaxia
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2011, 07:08:00 pm »


Wonder if this was a reason for Nintendo's Virtual Boy failing.  Besides the images looking like a jumble of red and black.  I played around with one briefly in a store.  I've personally never had issues with viewing 3D, nor has my family, but our only exposure has been at the movie theater.  We've been in no rush to see 3D on televisions at home.  There isn't a public outcry about 3D televisions affecting vision yet, but those things are very expensive, and many people might be waiting to make the "upgrade".


The virtual boy failed because it made people physically ill after playing for more than an hour, if I remember right.
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2011, 08:03:37 pm »

The virtual boy failed because it made people physically ill after playing for more than an hour, if I remember right.

Just checked the Wikipedia page on it, it mentions that games came with an option to automatically pause every 15-30 minutes so the player would get a break.  Getting sick after playing for an hour sounds about right, then.  It also says that it was released before it was really finished, to allow them to focus on the N64.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_Boy

There was probably a time when I wanted a Virtual Boy, since I was a fanboy that read Nintendo Power every month.  But as a die-hard Sega fan pointed out at the bus stop one morning back then, the visuals weren't really that impressive, and those were the whole point of the system.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2011, 12:03:30 am by Webmaster_Kami » Logged
Galaxia
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2011, 03:09:33 am »

They weren't at all, really primitive red and blue 3D. I've seen games from the early 80's with better graphics.

From a conversation on Twitter, you'll be able to turn the 3D off, and there's no mention of blindness or eye cancer on Nintendo's Japanese page.
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« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2011, 09:45:52 am »

Ah, so that's what the 3D/2D thing on the system is for.  I'm still not sure who originally brought up the possibility of eye cancer.  Blindness or impaired vision sound more realistic, as Maki pointed out.
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Galaxia
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« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2011, 10:16:36 am »

I don't know, I first heard of it in the article I quoted.
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